Handbook of Democratic Innovation and Governance

Handbook cover

We’re really excited to present the Handbook of Democratic Innovation and Governance, co-edited by Stephen Elstub and I, featuring 38 chapters by 60 authors covering this field of research and practice around the world

The book includes six sections:

  1. Types of democratic innovation
  2. Democratic innovations and the democratic malaise
  3. Actors in democratic innovation
  4. Democratic innovations in policy and governance
  5. Democratic innovations around the world
  6. Research methods for the study of democratic innovation

There are two open access chapters offering an overview of the book, you can read and share for free here:

An introduction to the field of democratic innovation

And a chapter defining and typologising democratic innovations

Thanks to contributors & supporters working with us for 3 years. We share the hope that the book satisfies curiosity & inspires action. Can 2020 turn around the democratic recession by reimagining political life? This is the challenge & opportunity of our generation!

E-books available to purchase from:

Elgar Publishing

Google Play

eBooks

Vital Source

Hardback edition for institutional libraries

back cover

New evidence review: equality in community engagement

evidence reviewEquality and community engagement are central to core policy developments and frameworks that guide current public sector reform: i.e. Christie Commission on the Future Delivery of Public Services; Community Empowerment Act 2015; Fairer Scotland; Convention of Scottish Local Authorities’ Commission on Strengthening Local Democracy.

The key motivation for this review of the literature is to explore the intersection between community engagement and inequality. This is important because inequalities in health, wealth, income, education and so on, can be arguably seen as stemming from inequalities in power and influence. Therefore, community engagement processes can simply reproduce existing inequalities, unless they are designed and facilitated to distribute influence by ensuring diversity and inclusion.

Find out more and download the publication in our WWS website.

What are Mini-publics?

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This Research Note introduces a range of ‘mini-publics’ and outlines key features, how they work, and how they may improve opportunities for citizens to contribute to public deliberation and participatory governance.

Introduction:

The idea of mini-publics was first proposed four decades ago by political scientist Robert Dahl. Inspired by democratic ideals and social science principles, Dahl envisioned an innovative mechanism for involving citizens in dealing with public issues. He called it ‘minipopulus’: an assembly of citizens, demographically representative of the larger population, brought together to learn and deliberate on a topic in order to inform public opinion and decision-making. A growing number of democratic innovations have flourished around the world based on this idea, from Citizens’ Juries, to Planning Cells, Consensus Conferences, Deliberative Polls and Citizens’ Assemblies. Mini-publics have been used to deal with topics ranging from constitutional and electoral reform, to controversial science and technology, and myriad social issues (e.g. health, justice, planning, sectarianism).

The paper includes answers to frequently asked questions about mini-publics. You can also see more examples and resources on the What Works Scotland website.

 

 

 

 

New report for Participatory Budgeting practitioners, activists and policy makers in Scotland and beyond

An exciting collaboration has been established between the Glasgow Centre for Population Health (GCPH) and What Works Scotland (WWS) to support the strategic and operational delivery of Participatory Budgeting within Scotland and beyond.

PB Harkins-Escobar front cover

The first output from this collaboration is a joint publication by Chris Harkins and Oliver Escobar: Participatory budgeting in Scotland: an overview of strategic design choices and principles for effective delivery.

The paper takes stock of the policy context for PB in Scotland, and outlines ten strategic PB design choices and ten principles for effective delivery. The metaphor here is not ‘transplanting’ but translating and adapting. PB delivery organisations, communities and citizens involved in the PB process are thus encouraged to use the design choices and principles selectively, flexibly and reflectively as meets their specific purpose, need and context.